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Men without Women

女のいない男たち

Onna No Inai Otokatach

First published in Japan by Bungeishunju (2014)

Translated by Ted Goossen and Philip Gabriel

US edition to be published: 9th May 2017 by Knopf:
Hardcover: 240 pages
ISBN: 978-0451494627
Amazon.com

UK edition to be published: 9th May 2017 by Harvill Secker :
Hardcover: 240 pages
ISBN: 978-1911215370
Amazon.co.uk

'I find writing novels a challenge, writing stories a joy. If writing novels is like planting a forest, then writing short stories is more like planting a garden.'

Across seven tales, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are vanishing cats and smoky bars, lonely hearts and mysterious women, baseball and the Beatles, woven together to tell stories that speak to us all.

Men Without Women is Haruki’s first story collection in nine years and features seven stories.

Excerpt: The call came in after one a.m. and woke me up. Phones ringing in the middle of the night always sound harsh and grating, like some savage metal tool out to destroy the world. I felt it was my duty, as a member of the human race, to put a stop to it, so I got out of bed, padded over to the living room, and picked up the receiver.

An longer excerpt is available from Random House

Yesterday, Scheherazade and Kino are available on the New Yorker web site

Contents:
Forward – 8 pages
Drive My Car – 52 pages
Yesterday – 52 pages
Independent Bodies – 52 pages
Scheherazade – 42 pages
Kino – 52 pages
Men Without Women- 22 pages

 

Article

A Quiet Panic - There are shades of Hemingway in these stories about men who choose loneliness in the avoidance of pain- Guardian review by M John Harrison

Island life - The gap between the sexes seems unbridgeable in this beguiling collection of short stories - Financial Times review by Arifa Akbar

New From Murakami: Tales of Cool Cars, Shinto Spirits and Lost Love - New York Times review by Jay Fielden

Haruki Murakami’s long-awaited return to the short story is a masterclass in pacing and the tragicomic revelation - The Observer review by Kate Kellaway

Haruki Murakami: Men Without Women review - a bit too abstract and post-modern - The Arts Desk review by Markie Robson-Scott

Waiting for a new Murakami, in between dream and reality - Indian Express review by Ram Sarangan

Minneapolis Star Tribune review by Tom Zelman

A collection of short stories that long on loneliness - Evening Standard review by Ian Thomson

'Men Without Women' is classic, hard-to-pin-down Murakami - Vice review by Tana Wojczuk

‘Men Without Women’ and the music of lonelines - The Times of India micro review

Chicago Tribune review by Shoshana Olidort

Haruki Murakami’s surreal short stories linger in the memory, even if the plots don’t - South China Morning Post review by Suzanne Harrison

Haruki Murakami presents a lonely universe of short stories - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette review by Michael Magras

‘Men Without Women’ offers familiar taste of Haruki Murakami after long wait - New York Daily News review by Thomas Levinson

Herald Scotland review by Keith Bruce,

Washington Post review by Heller McAlpin

Love is a wound, or something like that, in Haruki Murakami's new collection - Los Angeles Times review by Jeffery Renard Allen

In ‘Men Without Women,’ the men are all pilgrims following devastating loss - Boston Globe review by Priscilla Gilman

Murakami collection features lonely 'Men Without Women' - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel review by Mike Fischer

The Wonderful, Woeful World Of Haruki Murakami's 'Men Without Women' - WBUR review by Ed Siegel

Random House readers guide

Murakami Haruki’s new book: “The Men Without Women” article by Kieran Maynard

New Murakami Collection – “Men Without Women” - howtojaponese article by Daniel Morales

Plural? Singular? Translation Problems with "Men Without Women" - by Translating Haruki Murakami

More on Singular or Plural, and on Womanless Men - by Translating Haruki Murakami

Reviews

Spectrum Culture review by Nick Gregorio

Kirkus Review - Not groundbreaking but certainly vintage Murakami: a little arch, a little tired, but always elegant.

Japan Kaleidoskop review by Marion